Anti-inflammatory diet linked to reduced risk of early death

A new study finds that adhering to an anti-inflammatory diet is associated with lower risks of dying from any cause, dying from cardiovascular causes, and dying from cancer. In the study of 68,273 Swedish men and women aged 45 to 83 years who were followed for 16 years, participants who most closely followed an anti-inflammatory… Continue reading Anti-inflammatory diet linked to reduced risk of early death

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Discovery unlocks secrets behind cancer drug resistance

 University of Otago research provides insights into an underlying mechanism that could explain why new cancer therapies to help treat metastatic melanoma do not always work on patients, paving the way for predicting which patients will benefit from certain drugs. Their findings shed much needed light on why new immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies such as… Continue reading Discovery unlocks secrets behind cancer drug resistance

Off/on switch for DNA repair protein

Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. The authors say they hope this discovery research will help identify new therapies for ovarian cancer. While the human genome is constantly damaged, cells have proteins that detect… Continue reading Off/on switch for DNA repair protein

New type of lung cancer

Researchers have discovered a new kind of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The discovery paves the way for developing personalized medicine approaches to target this previously unnoticed form of the disease. "Cancer is not one thing, it's actually hundreds of distinct diseases." This common refrain helps explain the frustrating experience oncologists have in testing a promising… Continue reading New type of lung cancer

Why older people respond poorly to cancer treatment

Researchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells this may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines,… Continue reading Why older people respond poorly to cancer treatment

Genetic markers for prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second-most common cancer in American men, with one in nine men being diagnosed in their lifetime, and the third-leading cause of cancer death for men.An international team of researchers and USC scientists has found scores of new genetic markers in DNA code that increase prostate cancer risk. With the power knowledge likely… Continue reading Genetic markers for prostate cancer

Genome-editing tool could increase cancer risk

Latest study from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and University of Helsinki, Finlandsuggest that therapeutic use of gene editing with the so-called CRISPR-Cas9 techniquemay inadvertently increase the risk of cancer. Although researchers say that more studies are required in order to guarantee the safety of these 'molecular scissors' for gene-editing therapies. CRISPR-Cas9 is a molecular machine first discovered in bacteria that can be programmed… Continue reading Genome-editing tool could increase cancer risk